Home and Community Safety: Get Involved

Robert W. Campbell, first president of the National Safety Council, once described safety as an economic necessity and the study of the right way to do things. Today, NSC offers individuals and organizations a number of different ways to get involved in its mission:

Community Training

NSC is partnering with community leaders across America to provide free Surviving an Active Shooter Event training. While you are 700 times more likely to die in a car crash than an active shooter event, safety is about being prepared. There are smart actions you can take to improve your chances of survival should you find yourself in proximity to a shooter.

Survivor Network

The Survivor Advocate Network is a community of individuals and families whose lives have been forever changed by teen drivers, distracted drivers, prescription drug overdose or on-the-job incidents.It allows individuals and organizations to connect, share stories and advocate for change, the goal to eliminate preventable deaths. Help us stop everyday killers.

Safety Ambassadors

NSC is building its Safety Ambassadors program so you can better help protect your family, neighbors and others in your community. Anyone can be a Safety Ambassador. This summer, NSC will provide a roadmap on how to do it. All you need is a desire to work toward a common goal – safety. 

Green Cross Awards

NSC Green Cross for Safety awards are presented annually in a red carpet-like event to America’s safety leaders. The Green Cross awards recognize people and organizations for their contributions to the advancement of safety in the workplace, on the road, and in homes and communities.

National Safety Month

Each year in June, the National Safety Council observes National Safety Month. Time is set aside to reduce the leading causes of injury and death in the U.S. Make use of free NSC resources to highlight safety risks and plan for safety solutions.

Distracted Driving Awareness Month

Distracted Driving Awareness Month in April highlights the risks of distracted driving. Distraction is anything that diverts your attention away from the task at hand – driving. Manual distractions, like eating, drinking and grooming, and cognitive distractions, like talking on your phone, have contributed to a steady rise in motor vehicle traffic deaths. NSC offers downloadable materials you can share to reverse the trend.